Safeguarding & protecting young people

Safeguarding children is something all of us in Padel are responsible for, whether you're a parent, coach, volunteer, referee or player.
These pages include advice for parents on what sorts of checks they can make to ensure their children are in a safe environment, information for children and young people on looking after themselves, and guidance for everyone on child protection.

Safeguarding and Protecting Children

Padel should be a safe, friendly and enjoyable experience for all young people. The PEA (Padel England Association) is committed to complying with the National Standards for Safeguarding and Protecting Children in Sport. These are developed and assessed by the NSPCC.
We want to make sure that children enjoy Padel in a safe environment in which they are protected from any form of abuse. Our policies and guidance in this area are designed to support all Padel organisations to meet this goal.
Below you can find answers to some common questions about child protection in Padel. A full list of resource documents are available from the link on the right. On 16th June 2010, the government announced that it had halted the implementation of the Vetting and Barring Scheme. For information on the current situation and on how Padel people and Padel organisations should respond, please go to question seven.

Questions answered below;

-How do I learn more about safeguarding and protecting children?
-What should I do if I have a concern about the safety or welfare of a child?
-What are my child protection responsibilities if I work with children?
-How do I improve child protection and safeguarding in my club/facility?
-Who needs to complete a CRB check?
-What is the current situation with the Vetting and Barring Scheme?
-How many adults do I need to supervise my group?
-We have a programme at our club working with children with learning difficulties / disabilities, do we need to take additional steps on safeguarding?

1) How do I learn more about safeguarding and protecting children?
You can contact your county team to find out about spaces on a safeguarding workshop. This is a 3-hour workshop that will help to improve your knowledge and skills in this area. Request county contacts via info@padelengland.org

2) What should I do if I have a concern about the safety or welfare of a child?
You should carefully record an relevant facts and details and then report your concern. If a child tells you that they are being abused, you should listen carefully. Tell them that you will have to tell someone about the problem, and that you will try to see if someone can help. Do not begin to ask detailed questions about the concern, and don’t begin an investigation. You should report your concern to your local/club Child Protection Officer (CPO) or to your County CPO. If you need urgent advice, contact the PEA Safeguarding Department or your local Police or social services.

3) What are my child protection responsibilities if I work with children?
You have a duty of care toward any children that you work with. This means that you must take reasonable steps to protect those children from harm. To do this, you should ensure that you plan and carry out your activities in line with PEA guidance. You should also ensure that any other adults involved in your activities are properly recruited and vetted. If you work in a club, you should also encourage the club to put in place child protection measures to support all of the activities taking place at the club.

4) How do I improve child protection and safeguarding in my club/facility?
Make sure that you have a Child Protection Officer to co-ordinate your steps in this area.
You should also put in place a child protection policy so that your commitment is clear and visible:
The PEA Child Protection Officer’s ‘HITLIST’ provides a guide to the top priorities when tackling these issues within your club or facility. You can find the HITLIST and other resources to help you in setting up these systems on the Safeguarding and Child Protection Resources and Forms page.

5) Who needs to complete a CRB check?
A CRB check is just one way of making sure that you have the right people in place. You can find out more about good recruitment by reading our guide to safer recruitment, which you can access on the Safeguarding and Child Protection Resources and Forms page. The PEA will set up a dedicated CRB team to help you complete your CRB check. Find out more about CRB via info@padelengland.org

6) What is the current situation with the Vetting and Barring Scheme?
The Vetting and Barring Scheme (VBS) was created across England and Wales, to safeguard children and vulnerable adults by checking the records of those people wanting to work or volunteer with children and vulnerable adults.

The VBS built on the previous barring processes of:
Protection of Children Act (PoCA) List
List 99 (information held under S142 of the Education Act)
The Protection of Vulnerable Adults (PoVA) list
The Scottish Disqualified from Working with Children List.
As of 12th October 2009, it became an offence for a ‘barred’ person to work or volunteer with children and vulnerable adults, these arrangements remain in place. Any person on the Sex Offender’s Register is automatically placed on the ‘barred’ list. The Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA) maintains the barred list for both children and vulnerable adults. They also accept safeguarding referrals from employers and other regulatory bodies. In June 2010 ministers announced plans to stop the registration for VBS, pending a review. They felt that whilst the VBS was well intentioned, it was disproportionate in it’s response to those who actually pose a risk to children or vulnerable adults. Any individual who is either employed or volunteers working with children and / or vulnerable adults may be required to undertake a criminal records check. The PEA will advise you about who needs to undertake a CRB within your organisation. Please contact the Legal Services team for more information. For more information or queries please contact info@padelengland.org

7) How many adults do I need to supervise my group?
The general guidance for anyone looking after children is that you should use the following ratios:
Children under 10 years: 1 adult to 8 children
Children over 10 years: 1 adult to 10 children
Remember that these ratios will not always work. Plan your activities carefully, and think about what will happen in emergencies. What will happen if you need to deal with an injury? Are you doing anything that requires close supervision such as using gym equipment or travelling through busy places?

8) We have a programme at our club working with children with learning difficulties / disabilities, do we need to take additional steps on safeguarding?
Some children are more vulnerable than others, or face additional barriers in accessing help. This might be because of a disability, but equally could be related to their race, gender, age, religion or disability, sexual orientation, social background or culture. The PEA workshop ‘Safeguarding and Protecting Children’ provides some information about why children might need extra support or encouragement to make sure that their voice is heard. You, or your child protection officer, can contact the PEA safeguarding team for additional advice and support.

Further questions
If your question has not been answered here, please read the guidance provided on the Safeguarding and Child Protection Resources and Forms page. If you still need help and advice, contact the PEA Safeguarding team using the contact details outlined in question 1 above.